David Pope is that rare breed of performer who plays beautifully in all styles of music. He will alter his tone , phrasing, and articulation in an instant to accommodate Baroque, Romantic, or contemporary styles, and his jazz playing burns down the house. I’d be honored to have him play my music on any occasion.
— Michael Colgrass, Pulitzer-winning composer
 

David Pope is an accomplished saxophonist, composer, and author.  He has an international reputation for over one hundred published articles in Saxophone Journal and Saxophone Today.  As a soloist, he has performed throughout the United States and in Europe and Asia.  As a classical and a jazz saxophonist, he has performed at the New England Saxophone Symposium, the International Society for Improvised Music, conferences of the North American Saxophone Alliance, and at the World Saxophone Congress.  He recently served on the jury of the prestigious $100,000 M-prize (University of Michigan).

Widely recognized for his unique mastery of multiphonics, he has publications with Hal Leonard and Dorn Publications.  He can be heard on Open Loop Records, Albany Records, Dazzle Recordings, and with Barry Long's Freedom in the Air. 

 

His students are incredibly successful, teaching and performing throughout the world, from New Hampshire to California, and in Brazil, the United Kingdom, and Japan.  In addition to 17 years on the faculty at James Madison University, he has given masterclasses across the US and abroad.  He will be returning to the faculty of the Asia Pacific Saxophone Academy (Bangkok) in 2018.

David Pope plays a wide variety of instruments, including Armenian duduk, small hand percussion, and various wood flutes from around the world.  He endorses the R.S. Berkeley "Virtuoso" alto and tenor saxophones and the AMT "True Acoustic" microphone.  

 
David Pope’s cd has continued to impress me, not only as a creative exploration of the saxophone’s sonic potential, but more importantly by the masterful way in which he incorporated this extended palette into his music soul. A major step in the instrument’s continued evolution.
— Donald Sinta, Professor Emeritus of Saxophone, University of Michigan